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Tuesday, May 22, 2012

HOW TO CHANGE YOUR OWN DISK BRAKES


YOU CAN DO THIS!!!

The normal tools required:

  • FLOOR JACK
  • JACK STAND(S)
  • FOUR WAY LUG WRENCH OR AIR WRENCH IF YOU HAVE ONE
  • SOCKET SET OR BOX END WRENCHES
  • "C" CLAMP
  • HAMMER  (just in case)
  • SCREW DRIVER
  • WIRE
  • ALLEN WRENCH SET 
  • TORX WRENCH SET
  • BRAKE PARTS CLEANER 
  • NEW ROTORS
  • NEW PADS
Usually there are only the lug nuts and four bolts needed to be removed in order to change disc brakes.

FIRST

Locate a hard surface to do the work on so the jack does not sink in to the dirt or gravel.   Loosen the lug nuts (DO NOT TAKE THEM ALL THE WAY OFF, JUST LOOSEN THEM) so you  are able to use the weight of the vehicle to hold the tire still to make it easier to get them loose.   Look under the vehicle and find the correct location to place the jack without damaging other parts of the vehicle.  Once you have  located this spot, jack up the vehicle to a height that you can get a jack stand under it in the event that the jack would give out, safety first.  Let the jack down onto the stands very slowly and slightly rock the vehicle to be sure it is steady and will not fall onto you while you are working on the vehicle.


SECOND

Remove the lug nuts and remove the tire. I usually sit on the tire while i work on the brakes.  Look at the whole brake assembly.  You will see a Rotor, a Caliper, slide pins, pads, bolts to hold on the bracket that holds the caliper in place, and a flexible hose.  Take note of how it is put together and how it all works.  in the hose there is hydraulic fluid that pushes against the piston in the caliper which in turn pushes on the brakes pads forcing them against the rotor stopping the vehicle using friction.
1 pads - 2 rotor - 3 caliper - 4 rubber dust boot -  5 piston -  6 flexible hose - 7 slide pin tube - 8 slide pin bolt boot - 9 wheel bearing hub - 10 lugs

THIRD

Remove the slide pin bolts holding the caliper in place and take out the old brake pads.  Using a piece of wire to hold up the caliper tie it up so there is no excess pressure the the flexible hose, and it is out of the way.  Now remove the bolts holding the bracket that holds the caliper in place, these bolts may be Allen style, Torx style or regular bolts - metric or standard. Remove the rotor.  Older vehicle rotors also contained the wheel bearings and hub.  Most rotors now do no contain the hub and wheel bearings.  They are as pictured above.



LASTLY 

Put the new rotor on, bolt the bracket for the caliper back on, put the new pads in it, using the "C" clamp and an old brake pad, put the old brake pad against the piston in the caliper and slowly crank it back into the caliper so there is enough space to put the caliper over the thickness of the new rotor and pads.  Put the caliper back on and the slide pin bolts back in.   Spray the whole assembly down with brake parts cleaner to remove any grease and the factory coating from the rotor and pads.  Put the tire back on and you are done.  Raise the car off of the jack stand, remove it and let the vehicle down.

I KNOW IT WAS QUICK BUT IT'S THAT EASY!!

I HOPE THIS HELPED

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OLOE